Podcast Location:
Download it here [file size: 18.5 MB]
Categories:
Human Rights, Civil Liberties & Public Law
Criminal Law
CPD Points:
Up to 1 point. details »

Due to the difference in guidelines between the SRA and the Bar Standards Board, CPD points are awarded differently for Solicitors, Barristers and Legal Executives:

Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority:
Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 CPD point (60 minutes)
Listen only, gain ½ a CPD point (30 minutes)

Regulated by the Bar Standards Board:
Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 accredited CPD point (60 minutes)

Regulated by ILEX:
Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 CPD point (60 minutes)
Listen only, gain ½ a CPD point (30 minutes)

Cost:
  • FREE
Length:
30 minutes of audio
(+ optional 5 minute online quiz)
Plays on Computer:
Yes Downloadable as MP3:    Yes
Contributor(s):
Course Aims:

The podcast gives an overview of the key issues that surround Police Powers and Actions Against the Police. It will examine the most recent case law and also the changes to PACE proposed by the Home Office in August 2008. The key areas that will be examined in this podcast (Part 1) include the rules on use of personal information, search powers and powers of arrest and detention.

Outcomes:
After completing the course you will:
  • Understand the rules pertaining to the police use of personal information;
  • Understand the European Court of Human Right's ruling in R (S & Marper) v South Yorkshire Police [2004] 1 WLR 2196;
  • Know recent cases that have challenged police use of personal information;
  • Understand the proposals relating to police use of personal information made in the PACE review;
  • Know the facts and ruling of the high profile police search powers case Redknapp v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis [2008] EWHC 1177;
  • Understand the changes proposed by the PACE Review to police powers of entry and searches;
  • Know what a police officer must do to establish lawful authority for an arrest;
  • Understand recent cases that deal generally with the power of arrest and detain;
  • Know the proposed changes to the powers of arrest and detention outlined in the PACE review;
  • Appreciate the facts of the recent case G v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police [2008] 1 WLR 550.
Level:
Intermediate Difficulty: 3 of 5
Classification:
Case Update
Legal Principles
Sources and References:
  • PACE Review: Government proposals to the Review of PACE 1984;
  • R (S & Marper) v South Yorkshire Police [2004] 1 WLR 2196;
  • Marper v UK 30562/04 [2008] ECHR 1581 (4 December 2008) ;
  • Wood v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis [2008] EWHC 1105 (Admin), Times 13th June 2008;
  • L v Metropolitan Police Commissioner [2008] 1 WLR 681;
  • Redknapp v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis [2008] EWHC 1177;
  • Keegan v UK (28867/03) (2007) 44 EHRR 33;
  • R (Cronin) South Yorkshire Police [2003] 1 WLR 752;
  • Metropolitan Police Commissioner v Raissi [2008] EWCA Civ 1237;
  • O'Hara v Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary [1997] AC 286;
  • Wood v DPP [2008] [EWHC] 1056;
  • Austin v Metropolitan Police Commissioner [2007] EWCA 989;
  • G v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police [2008] 1 WLR 550.

In this first podcast in our two-part series on Police Powers and Actions Against the Police, we interview Stephen Cragg, a barrister at Doughty Street Chambers. The podcast reviews some of the areas of interest in the case law relating to the criminal justice system and police powers. It also looks at the proposed changes to PACE in the Home Office Consultation paper of August 2008, entitled the 'PACE Review: Government proposals to the Review of PACE 1984.' The key areas of examination in this podcast (Part 1) include the rules on use of personal information, search powers and powers of arrest and detention.

Podcast Added: 13/02/2009

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