Podcast Location:
Download it here [file size: 18.7 MB]
Categories:
Immigration and Asylum Law
CPD Points:
Up to 1 point. details »

Due to the difference in guidelines between the SRA and the Bar Standards Board, CPD points are awarded differently for Solicitors, Barristers and Legal Executives:

Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority:
Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 CPD point (60 minutes)
Listen only, gain ½ a CPD point (30 minutes)

Regulated by the Bar Standards Board:
Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 accredited CPD point (60 minutes)

Regulated by ILEX:
Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 CPD point (60 minutes)
Listen only, gain ½ a CPD point (30 minutes)

Cost:
  • FREE
Length:
30 minutes of audio
(+ optional 5 minute online quiz)
Plays on Computer:
Yes Downloadable as MP3:    Yes
Contributor(s):
Course Aims:

In Osborne Clarke Services v Purohit (2009) UKEAT/0305/08 the Employment Appeals Tribunal asserted that it is contrary to the law for an applicant to be prevented from pursuing a legal career in the UK on the basis of their nationality. This podcast questions whether the immigration rules, as they currently stand, account for this.

Outcomes:
After completing the course you will:
  • Understand the reasoning of the Employment Appeals Tribunal in the Osborne Clarke decision;;
  • Know the potential routes migrants have to the UK to qualify as lawyers;;
  • Know how the recent changes in immigration policy could potentially have a negative impact on such migrants.
Level:
Beginner Difficulty: 1 of 5
Classification:
Case Update
Legal Principles
Sources and References:
  • Osborne Clarke Services v Purohit [2009] UKEAT 0305_08_0902.
Tags:

In this CPDcast Fiona Ball looks at the recent decision of the Employment Appeals Tribunal in Osborne Clarke Services v Purohit (2009) UKEAT/0305/08 where it confirmed that it is against the law to prevent a job applicant from pursuing a legal career in the UK on the basis of their nationality. In this context, the possible routes migrants have for entering the UK to study law, or work as a solicitor or barrister are then considered.

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