Podcast Location:
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Categories:
Family Law
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Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 CPD point (60 minutes)
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Cost:
  • FREE
Length:
30 minutes of audio
(+ optional 5 minute online quiz)
Plays on Computer:
Yes Downloadable as MP3:    Yes
Contributor(s):
Course Aims:

In this CPDcast Anna Simmonds from The International Family Law Group discusses consent orders in financial proceedings and the circumstances in which they can be broken. She outlines the law, practice and procedure involved in making an application to set aside a consent order and the difficult public policy principles at play.

Outcomes:
After completing the course you will:
  • Have considered the family court’s discretionary powers to set aside a consent order;
  • Be aware of some of the most common allegations used to undermine the basis of a consent order;
  • Be familiar with the procedure involved;
  • Be aware of some of the most relevant authorities which serve to illustrate the court’s approach to these cases.
Level:
General Interest Difficulty: 2 of 5
Classification:
Legal Principles
Legislative Updates
Sources and References:
  • Ampthill Peerage case (1976) 2 WLR 777;
  • Amey v Amey (1992) 2 FLR 89;
  • Barder v Barder (Caluori intervening) (1987) 2 FLR 480;
  • Bokor-Ingram [2009] EWVA Civ 412;
  • Civil Procedure Rules 1998;
  • Cornick v Cornick [1994] 2 FLR 530;
  • Dixon v Marchant [2008] 1 FLR 655;
  • Family Procedure Rules 2010;
  • Gohil v Gohil [2014] EWCA Civ 274;
  • Jenkins v Livesey (1985)AC 424 HOL;
  • Lazarus Estates v Beazley (1956) 1 QB 702;
  • Moyniham (No 2) (1997) 1 FLR 59;
  • Myerson v Myerson [2009] EWCA Civ 282;
  • NLW v ARC (2012) EWHC 55;
  • Richardson v Richardson [2011] EWCA Civ 79;
  • Rose v Rose [2003] EWHC 505 (Fam);
  • Rose (2003) 2 FLR 197;
  • S v S (Ancillary Relief: Application to set aside order) [2009] EWHC 2377 (Fam);
  • S v S (Ancillary Relief: Consent Order) (2002) 1 FLR 992;
  • Sharland (2014) EWCA 95;
  • T v M (2003) EWHC 1585;
  • Vicary (1992) 2 FLR 271;
  • Wlkden [2010] 1 FLR 174;
  • Williams v Lindley [2005] EWCA Civ 103.
Tags:

In this CPDcast Anna Simmonds from The International Family Law Group explains the grounds for setting aside family court consent orders.

Date Recorded: 16th May 2014

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