Podcast Location:
Download it here [file size: 44.7 MB]
Categories:
Family Law
CPD Points:
Up to 1 point. details »

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Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority:
Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 CPD point (60 minutes)
Listen only, gain ½ a CPD point (30 minutes)

Regulated by the Bar Standards Board:
Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 accredited CPD point (60 minutes)

Regulated by ILEX:
Listen and pass the quiz: Gain 1 CPD point (60 minutes)
Listen only, gain ½ a CPD point (30 minutes)

Cost:
  • FREE
Length:
30 minutes of audio
(+ optional 5 minute online quiz)
Plays on Computer:
Yes Downloadable as MP3:    Yes
Contributor(s):
Course Aims:

This podcast is aimed at family law practitioners interested in proposals to introduce a presumption in favour of shared parenting. It considers the current position when parents separate; the problems that can arise when two separated parents both have parental responsibility and the implications of establishing a presumption of shared parenting.

Outcomes:
After completing the course you will:
  • Have considered the current legal position and guiding principles determining decisions relating to the upbringing of children when parents separate;
  • Appreciate how parental responsibility is established;
  • Have considered some of the disputes that can arise when two separated parents both have parental responsibility;
  • Know how residency or contact is decided and know what Shared Residence Orders entail;
  • Be aware of case law developments and appreciate how the family courts have tended to approach the issue of shared parenting;
  • Have considered the proposals to create a legal presumption of equal rights for parents and the practical implications.
Level:
Beginner Difficulty: 1 of 5
Classification:
Introduction
Legal Principles
Market Update / Hot Topic
Sources and References:
  • A v A (Minors) (Shared Residence Order) [1994] 1 FLR 669;
  • A v A [2004] 1 FLR 195;
  • Children Act 1989;
  • D v D (Shared Residence Order) [2001] FLR 495;
  • Gillick v West Norfolk and Wisbech Area Health Authority and another [1985] 3 All ER 402;
  • Re AR (a Child: Relocation) [2010] EWHC 1346;
  • Re F (Shared Residence Order) [2003] EWCA Civ 592;
  • Re G (Children) [2006] 1 FLR 771;
  • Re H (Shared Residence: Parental Responsibility) [1995] 2 FLR 883;
  • Re M (Residence Order) [2008] EWCA Civ 66;
  • Re P (Shared Residence Order) [2005] EWCA Civ 1639);
  • Re R (Residence: Shared Care: Children's views) [2005] EWCA Civ 542);
  • Re W (Shared Residence Order) [2009] EWCA Civ 370;
  • Riley v Riley [1986] 2 FLR 429;
  • Shared Parenting Orders Bill (2010-2012);
  • T v T [2010] EWCA Civ 1366.
Tags:

In this podcast, family law specialist Bindu Bansal from Dutton Gregory discusses proposals to introduce a presumption in favour of shared parenting following a divorce or separation.

Date Recorded: 21 December 2012

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